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Malaysia

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Talk to a previous volunteer

Would you like to get in touch with a previous volunteer? We have a large register with previous volunteers who are happy to help you and can give you important information before your trip.


Malaysia is like two countries in one. It’s the Malaysian peninsula, squeezed in between Thailand and Singapore, but also the Malaysian part of the island Borneo. While the peninsula flaunts with thriving cities, colonial architecture, foggy tea plantations and quite islands, Malaysian Borneo parades with a wild jungle and spectacular diving.
In Malaysia you will find everything from shining skyscrapers in Kuala Lumpur, to traditional longhouses in Sarawak.
Even though there is a lot of people living in a not so big country, there is huge areas with rampant jungle and mountain regions where few people live. About 85% of the population lives at the Malaysian peninsula.

What to do

Malaysia is mostly known for their white beaches and untouched nature, but even a person looking for the big city life will be pleased by the shopping in Kuala Lumpur. When you are not volunteering there is a bunch of exciting activities and attractions to visit. Here is some of them:

Petronas Twin Towers is the seventh tallest skyscraper in the world with its 451,9 meters. And it gets even more amazing when the darkness has fallen.

Langkawi is the perfect paradise island due to its long white beaches and turquoise water, but the main reason to go here is probably the breathtaking cable car going up the mountains and takes you to a bridge crossing huge gap.

Batu Caves is a number of caves at the west coast of the Malaysian Peninsula. It’s a holy place for Hindus and every year people gathers here to celebrate the Thaipusam festival.

Kek Lok Si is one of the country’s oldest Buddhist temples and is a beautiful sight with its well-kept gardens.

Nationalparks

Malaysia is mostly known for their white beaches and untouched nature, but even a person looking for the big city life will be pleased by the shopping in Kuala Lumpur. When you are not volunteering there is a bunch of exciting activities and attractions to visit. Here is some of them:

Petronas Twin Towers is the seventh tallest skyscraper in the world with its 451,9 meters. And it gets even more amazing when the darkness has fallen.

Langkawi is the perfect paradise island due to its long white beaches and turquoise water, but the main reason to go here is probably the breathtaking cable car going up the mountains and takes you to a bridge crossing huge gap.

Batu Caves is a number of caves at the west coast of the Malaysian Peninsula. It’s a holy place for Hindus and every year people gathers here to celebrate the Thaipusam festival.

Kek Lok Si is one of the country’s oldest Buddhist temples and is a beautiful sight with its well-kept gardens.

 

Beaches

Rawa is an island outside the Malaysian Peninsulas east coast. Here you go to rest in a hammock, snorkel, rest in the bungalow, drink some coconut milk… that’s about it. This is an island for honeymoons, wedding days and romance.

Perhentians is a wonderful island with crystal clear water, bonfires and bioluminescence beaches. But remember! You should always take care of your garbage and this is not an exception.

 

Culture

Islam is the dominating religion, but next to the mosques there is churches and temples for both Hindus and Buddhists. The three biggest ethnic groups is the Malays, Chinese and Indians, and this diversity of people gives Malaysia a colorful and very mixed culture.

The thread connecting the country is made by well tasted food. Malaysian Nasi Lemak, Chinese buffets, Indian curry dishes and western hamburgers, all served for a small amount of money. Some people say you can eat your way through all of Asia without leaving Kuala Lumpur.

Climate

Malaysia has a tropical, warm and humid climate all year round. The average temperature is about 21-32 Celsius, with the peak in April-May.  The yearly monsoon hits the country and most affected is the east coast in October through February.

 

 

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